CalmiGo

Drive to end cancer could pioneer diagnostic technology

Latest articles

Billionaire donates $220m for peak performance research

Salk Institute, UC San Diego and Stanford given $220 million by Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance to research molecular underpinnings of peak human performance. A Salk...

Longevity senotherapeutics report: Insilico Medicine

Insilico – on a mission to accelerate senescence drug discovery and development by continuously inventing and deploying new AI technologies. Over the coming weeks, we...

Product review: Bearaby weighted blanket

Bearaby weighted blankets are on a mission to provide you with deep sleep, peace of mind and a joyful feeling.   GO LONG    GO SHORT ...

Aging well: the new human imperative

Prof Andrew Scott touts the importance of compressing morbidity and aging well to realise multi-trillion dollar benefit of increasing life expectancy. Earlier this year, we...

Most read

New NAD+ boosting longevity supplement hits the market

Elevant Prime dietary supplement contains a “high purity” form of NMN that has completed safety and toxicology testing. New York based health and wellness brand...

David Sinclair to co-chair $200 million biotech SPAC

Christian Angermayer's Frontier Acquisition Corp. holds significant longevity interest with David Sinclair and Peter Attia as Co-Chairs of the Board. Frontier Acquisition Corporation, a special...

Tree of Longevity – understanding how supplements work

Pathways? Hallmarks? Biomarkers? Understanding the longevity supplements lingo can help you make better choices for your healthspan. Longevity supplements differ from other 'generic supplements' as...
Seno

Editor's picks

Billionaire donates $220m for peak performance research

Salk Institute, UC San Diego and Stanford given $220 million by Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance to research molecular underpinnings of peak human performance. A Salk...

Longevity senotherapeutics report: Insilico Medicine

Insilico – on a mission to accelerate senescence drug discovery and development by continuously inventing and deploying new AI technologies. Over the coming weeks, we...

Product review: Bearaby weighted blanket

Bearaby weighted blankets are on a mission to provide you with deep sleep, peace of mind and a joyful feeling.   GO LONG    GO SHORT ...
CalmiGo

Click the globe for translations.

Blood test that can determine a cancer signal origin with high accuracy is now available on prescription in the US and could lead to regular screenings for other diseases and age-related conditions.

GRAIL, a healthcare company headquartered in Menlo Park, California, is an organisation tasked with the assignment of detecting cancer early, when it is still curable. Their primary goal is to save lives, and to prevent cancer from taking lives, but could its diagnostic platform also bring a slew of longevity benefits?

Longevity.Technology: GRAIL is building on its earlier commercial partnership programme with the NHS which aims to confirm Galleri’s clinical and economic performance in the UK healthcare system as a precursor to its routine use by the NHS. Now available on prescription in the US, and with a study on the clinical outcomes of 35,000 individuals announced, a simple blood draw could provide diagnostic information capable of preventing disease through early detection and intervention.

GRAIL has presented its first results for PATHFINDER, an interventional study evaluating the multi-cancer early detection test, (MCED,) which is also called Galleri™. The study was originally designed with the goal of achieving diagnostic resolution by way of following clinical pathways. This study specifically analysed those aged 50 and older because of their increased risk of cancer. None of the 6,629 subjects had suspicion of active cancer.

Preliminary data from Galleri suggests detection of 29 different individual cancers across 13 types. Those types being the breast, colon or rectum, head and neck, liver and bile duct, lung, lymphoid leukaemia, lymphoma, ovary, pancreas, plasma cell neoplasm, prostate, small intestine and Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia. In the US, a clinical validation study demonstrated that an earlier version of Galleri detected over 50 types of cancer with a low false positive rate of less than 1% through a single blood draw.

In order to detect the cancers, the company uses the considerable strength of next-generation sequencing, population scale clinical studies, computer and data science. When a cancer is detected, Galleri has the capability of localising the signal with high accuracy from a single blood draw.

Grail
Scientist working in the Grail lab.

New data published in Clinical Cancer Research, also demonstrate the ability of GRAIL’s technology to preferentially detect cancers that are more aggressive than expected based on age and the cancer stage and type. As several cancers are age-related, the detection could possibly be used to correlate with biological aging, understanding in greater depth the risks of aging and how to detect them.

With such a low false positive rate, the future certainly looks bright for Galleri; this of course leads us to consider the possibilities of this technology reaching other diseases both diagnostically and preventively. The likelihood of comorbidities means that these blood draws will be collecting a whole range of biomarkers, not just for cancer. As the data is analysed, biomarker trends and traits could lead to the platform’s adaption into a test for the diseases of aging. Early detection means early intervention, and this can often make a significant different to patient outcome.

“The interim results of PATHFINDER demonstrate that a routine blood test is capable of detecting many different cancers even before symptoms arise, an approach that has significant potential advantages,” says Dr Tomasz M Beer, deputy director at the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute and presenting author.

Beer continues, “Most importantly, it can detect cancers that have no recommended screening tests today, and more than two-thirds of cancers go unscreened for this reason. These results are a pivotal step toward extending early detection to many more types of cancer [1].

Galleri

 

Galleri is available in the US by prescription only. The test is currently aimed at those who have an elevated risk of cancer and as a complement to existing single cancer screening tests.

GRAIL has announced a real-world evidence study it plans to establish called REFLECTION. This study will be to adjudicate clinical outcomes and experiences of 35,000 US subjects being prescribed the Galleri test through a healthcare provider. In addition, Galleri will be offered to eligible patients in the UK later this year as a partnership with the UK National Health Service.

The data from these studies will be of significant diagnostic value, both in understanding traits of aging, and pushing towards early detection. The drive to end cancer has the potential to pioneer the revolution of modern medical diagnosis technology, as it can detect problems before they arise. Getting regular check-ups could mean preventing countless other diseases from taking hold in the system, a preventative ethos that could slow aging across the board.

[1] https://bit.ly/2Tz2OK5

Images courtesy of Grail

Comment on this article

Eleanor Garth
Deputy Editor Now a science and medicine journalist, Eleanor worked as a consultant for university spin-out companies and provided research support at Imperial College London and various London hospitals in a former life.
CalmiGo

Most popular

New NAD+ boosting longevity supplement hits the market

Elevant Prime dietary supplement contains a “high purity” form of NMN that has completed safety and toxicology testing. New York based health and wellness brand...

David Sinclair to co-chair $200 million biotech SPAC

Christian Angermayer's Frontier Acquisition Corp. holds significant longevity interest with David Sinclair and Peter Attia as Co-Chairs of the Board. Frontier Acquisition Corporation, a special...

Tree of Longevity – understanding how supplements work

Pathways? Hallmarks? Biomarkers? Understanding the longevity supplements lingo can help you make better choices for your healthspan. Longevity supplements differ from other 'generic supplements' as...

Spermidine: the mind-enhancing supplement

Scientists are finding that a high intake of dietary spermidine could slow down (or reverse) the brain aging process. Memory loss and slower brain function...
Seno

Related articles

Detecting neurodegeneration – all in the blood?

Detection for protection – could biomarkers for dementia and neurodegeneration be the future? Neurodegenerative diseases are often linked to age, and, as the population ages, incidences...

Survey-based aging clock MindAge receives public release

Deep Longevity launches its MindAge psychological aging clock to the wider world – building on the data of over 250,000 people who have already...

Buck Institute announces aging clock for immunosenescence

10th hallmark of aging? Buck claims actionable clock can predict immunological health and chronic diseases of aging; research highlights the critical role of the...

Brigham and Wyss collaborate on Diagnostic Accelerator

Harvard’s Wyss Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital launch Diagnostic Accelerator which aims to create new diagnostic technologies through deep collaborations driven by unmet...

Occuity – shining a light on health and longevity

Forget windows to the soul, Occuity's non-invasive smart diagnostic tech provides a window to health and wellness. DISCLOSURE: Longevity.Technology (a brand of First Longevity Limited)...
Seno