How can you measure and increase your Klotho protein levels?

Latest articles

“World’s first” cultural-matching app for care sector launches

Care receivers can be paired with carer based on religious understanding and culture thanks to AI tech developed during pandemic. A graduate has created what...

Biotech LyGenesis expands its liver regeneration tech

A new peer-reviewed paper demonstrates the success of using fat-associated lymphoid clusters as expandable niches for ectopic liver regeneration. LyGenesis, a clinical-stage biotech developing cell...

NURO embarks on funding round for neurotech communication system

World’s first multimodal neurotech operating system from NURO allows you to communicate using just your brain. DISCLOSURE: Longevity.Technology (a brand of First Longevity Limited) has...

It’s time to reboot longevity and healthy aging

Dr Michael Roizen calls for fundamental societal changes to ensure the benefits of longevity and healthy aging are realised. Later this year, best-selling author Michael...

Most read

New supplement slows aging and promotes weight loss

Sugar-proof your way to a longer life. Reducing AGEs to slow aging and increase weight loss – how one supplement is fighting the war...

An antiaging supplement that also reduces appetite?

One for the AGEs: Juvify signs IP licensing deal with Buck Institute for GLYLO antiaging supplement that aims to reduce glycation. A researcher at the...

Resveratrol – the small molecule with big antiaging ideas

When it comes to antiaging molecules, we can learn a thing or two from plants. As so often in natural world, plants have a few...

Editor's picks

“World’s first” cultural-matching app for care sector launches

Care receivers can be paired with carer based on religious understanding and culture thanks to AI tech developed during pandemic. A graduate has created what...

Biotech LyGenesis expands its liver regeneration tech

A new peer-reviewed paper demonstrates the success of using fat-associated lymphoid clusters as expandable niches for ectopic liver regeneration. LyGenesis, a clinical-stage biotech developing cell...

NURO embarks on funding round for neurotech communication system

World’s first multimodal neurotech operating system from NURO allows you to communicate using just your brain. DISCLOSURE: Longevity.Technology (a brand of First Longevity Limited) has...

Click the globe for translations.

Unlocking the secrets of the Klotho protein could extend your lifespan and healthspan – but first you have to measure your Klotho levels.

The Klotho gene and its product, the α-Klotho protein, were discovered in 1997; since then, researchers have been investigating the significance of this mythologically-named protein, trying to find out what role it plays in aging, and whether that knowledge can be leveraged to extend lifespan and healthspan.

Longevity.Technology sponsored content: Ancient Greek mythology tells of three sisters – The Fates – who decided the lifespan of mortals. Klotho was the Fate responsible for spinning the thread of life, but can we use knowledge of the gene and protein named after her to spin ourselves a longer life? Does our own fate depend on Klotho, a protein that, when over-expressed in mice, has resulted in extended healthspan and lifespan – up to 30% longer life in some cases?

What is Klotho?

Klotho is a protein; proteins are made from amino acids – the building blocks of life. In the human body, there are 20 amino acids that function as building blocks of proteins. Amino acids are small organic molecules made up of an alpha, or central, carbon atom which is linked to an amino group, a carboxyl group and a hydrogen atom. Each amino acid also has a variable component called a side chain.

Join a few amino acids together and you have a peptide; join lots of amino acids together (or several peptides) and you have a polypeptide. A protein is one or more polypeptides, long chains of amino acids held together by peptide bonds. Proteins are vital for structure, growth and repair in the body, as well as transport, signaling, energy transport, enzymatic reactions and your immune system.

Where is Klotho made and what does it do?

Klotho is produced primarily in the kidneys.

Klotho suppresses both oxidative stress and senescence-associated inflammation, functioning as both an intracellular anti-inflammatory and an anti-aging factor [1]. It also regulates phosphate homeostasis and the activity of members of the fibroblast growth factor [2], plays a role in the brain–immune system interface [3], is neuroprotective [4] and protects the cardiovascular system [5] – and those are just some of Klotho’s vital roles.

What happens if I have low Klotho levels?

Low Klotho levels are associated with accelerated aging; this can include high blood pressure, calcification of arteries and heart valves, early onset dementia, cancer risk, muscle strength and other aging-related ailments.

Like so many things, levels of Klotho decline with age – but by looking to technology, rather than mythology, means we can find out exactly what our levels are and take remedial action if necessary.

Testing your Klotho levels

KlothoBios is a start-up dedicated to Klotho research, personal testing and increasing levels of Klotho with proprietary tech.

KlothoYears offers both an individual test at $599, or a less immediate, but more economical “crowdsourcing” version at $199; the latter allows the company to group multiple tests in a batch to keep costs down. In addition, KlothoBios aims to re-direct up to 50% of all profits from the sales of tests back into Klotho-related research and development including Klotho-based therapeutics.

How does a Klotho test work?

It starts with your blood. A small sample of blood is drawn at a recommended clinic or by a professional via an at-home visit. The sample is returned to KlothoYears by post and an ELISA (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay) Test performed to ascertain Klotho levels. A detailed report is sent to the customer, and KlothoBios will then direct its customers to not only a healthier lifestyle that can be measured and scored with subsequent KlothoYears test runs, but also to clinical studies and products that might have a beneficial effect on their healthspan and lifespan.

How can I increase my Klotho levels?

There is much research ongoing, but natural expression level of Klotho might well be impacted by the usual suspects – diet and exercise. In addition, activated charcoalprobiotics and statins have all demonstrated an ability to increase the production of Klotho.

Tech for improving your Klotho levels

KlothoBios is working on a therapy for improving Klotho levels. They have shown they can increase levels of Klotho through proprietary bioelectric stimulation signals and filed patents for controlling or upregulating Klotho release in vivo.

Featuring electrodes strategically located around the body, over and under the kidneys and over skeletal muscle to help stimulate circulatory Klotho production, the BodStim bioelectric body suit has patented bioelectric signals for increasing circulating Klotho. In fact, results have shown the BodStim can increase Klotho by up to 465% over baseline levels. The tech involves precise bioelectric signaling sequences that trigger the DNA and cell membranes within stimulated tissues to induce the cells to produce high volumes of the Klotho protein.

In addition, BodStim is also working on bioelectric stimulation research related to stomach abdominal stimulation to improve gut microbiota function with the intention to improve immune system strength, serotonin production and thus brain mood, including potentially reducing risk of dementia, memory-loss, depression and addictions.

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4608225/
[2] https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fendo.2020.00560/full
[3] https://www.pnas.org/content/115/48/E11388
[4] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30062646/
[5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4656911/

Eleanor Garth
Deputy Editor Now a science and medicine journalist, Eleanor worked as a consultant for university spin-out companies and provided research support at Imperial College London and various London hospitals in a former life.

Most popular

New supplement slows aging and promotes weight loss

Sugar-proof your way to a longer life. Reducing AGEs to slow aging and increase weight loss – how one supplement is fighting the war...

An antiaging supplement that also reduces appetite?

One for the AGEs: Juvify signs IP licensing deal with Buck Institute for GLYLO antiaging supplement that aims to reduce glycation. A researcher at the...

Resveratrol – the small molecule with big antiaging ideas

When it comes to antiaging molecules, we can learn a thing or two from plants. As so often in natural world, plants have a few...

Sugar-proof your health with the GLYLO weight loss and antiaging supplement

Move your New Year's resolution up a gear with GLYLO, a double-action supplement that can increase weight loss while also slowing aging. Choosing an effective...

Related articles

Abbott launches Lingo longevity wearable with continuous ketone tracking

Abbott pushes the envelope of biowearables as it announces its new tech for tracking ketones biomarkers. Abbott, the company behind the Freestyle Libre continuous glucose...

Stress makes life’s clock tick faster – and how to slow it down

Chronic stress accelerates the body’s epigenetic clock, but emotional regulation and self-control can slow that process down. In new research, a team from Yale has...

Defining the new field of longevity medicine

A consortium of scientists and medical doctors have collaborated to define the new field of longevity medicine. Today, a group of scientists and medical doctors...

A brain fitbit that can spot Alzheimer’s with up to 94% accuracy

Altoida raising new financing for augmented reality cognitive assessment platform that dramatically improves early detection of Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases. Earlier this year, AR-powered...

Immune systems and internal clocks in aging

We are an aging population – but what is happening internally as the years pass us by? We continue our overview of the Longevity Forum’s...

    Subscribe to our newsletter