MitoQ

How to boost muscle regeneration and rebuild tissue

Latest articles

Drive to end cancer could pioneer diagnostic technology

Blood test that can determine a cancer signal origin with high accuracy is now available on prescription in the US and could lead to...

Small is mighty when it comes to mitochondria supplements

Optimise, energise, revitalise – MitoQ is on a mission to supplement your mitochondrial health. Coenzyme Q10 – or CoQ10 – is made naturally in the...

Improving speed and accuracy in Alzheimer’s patients

Phase 2a study of patients with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's finds that ANVS401 treatment leads to significant improvement in speed and accuracy. Annovis Bio Inc, a...

New SIRT6 activator supplement hits the market

Sirtuin 6, the protein making waves in the longevity pool, can now be activated by a brand-new supplement. SIRT6 is a protein with an important...

Most read

New NAD+ boosting longevity supplement hits the market

Elevant Prime dietary supplement contains a “high purity” form of NMN that has completed safety and toxicology testing. New York based health and wellness brand...

David Sinclair to co-chair $200 million biotech SPAC

Christian Angermayer's Frontier Acquisition Corp. holds significant longevity interest with David Sinclair and Peter Attia as Co-Chairs of the Board. Frontier Acquisition Corporation, a special...

Tree of Longevity – understanding how supplements work

Pathways? Hallmarks? Biomarkers? Understanding the longevity supplements lingo can help you make better choices for your healthspan. Longevity supplements differ from other 'generic supplements' as...
fundraising

Editor's picks

Drive to end cancer could pioneer diagnostic technology

Blood test that can determine a cancer signal origin with high accuracy is now available on prescription in the US and could lead to...

Small is mighty when it comes to mitochondria supplements

Optimise, energise, revitalise – MitoQ is on a mission to supplement your mitochondrial health. Coenzyme Q10 – or CoQ10 – is made naturally in the...

Improving speed and accuracy in Alzheimer’s patients

Phase 2a study of patients with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's finds that ANVS401 treatment leads to significant improvement in speed and accuracy. Annovis Bio Inc, a...
MitoQ

Click the globe for translations.

New research from the Salk Institute spotlights molecular changes in underlying age-related muscle loss and signposts potential Yamanaka factor therapy.

A research team at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California has identified a stem cell-related muscle regeneration process and discovered that Yamanaka factors could lead the way to a therapy for repairing muscles after injury or protecting against frailty by rebuilding the muscle mass that is lost as we age.

Longevity.Technology: Losing muscle mass is part of aging; frail older people have lower muscle density and muscle mass, and this loss of muscle mass, not only contributes to disability in older people, but affects their ability to live independently and healthily. Researchers at the Salk Institute hope to counter this loss by accelerating the regeneration of muscle tissue. Understanding the underlying mechanisms related to muscle regeneration and growth and could mean a treatment in the future that could trigger an effective regeneration of tissue in aging adults.

In a study published in Nature Communications, the Salk team demonstrated that by using Yamanaka factors (compounds usually used in stem-cell research), they could increase the regeneration of muscle cells in mice by activating the precursors of muscle cells, called myogenic progenitors.

“Loss of these progenitors has been connected to age-related muscle degeneration,” says Salk Professor Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, the paper’s senior author. “Our study uncovers specific factors that are able to accelerate muscle regeneration, as well as revealing the mechanism by which this occurred [1].”

The Yamanaka factors (Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc) are a group of protein transcription factors that control how DNA is copied for translation into other proteins and that play a vital role in the creation of induced pluripotent stem cells – cells that have the ability to become any cell in the body.

“Our laboratory previously showed that these factors can rejuvenate cells and promote tissue regeneration in live animals,” says Chao Wang, first author of the study. “But how this happens was not previously known [1].”

Salk Institute
Induction of Yamanaka factors (OKSM) in muscle fibers increases the number of myogenic progenitors. Top, control; bottom, treatment. Red-pink color is Pax7, a muscle stem-cell marker. Blue indicates muscle nuclei. Credit: Salk Institute

The regeneration of muscle tissue is controlled by muscle stem cells, also called satellite cells. These satellite cells sit in a niche between a layer of connective tissue (basal lamina) and the muscle fibres (myofibres). The Salk team used two different mouse models to pinpoint the changes – whether muscle stem-cell-specific or niche-specific – that occurred following the addition of Yamanaka factors. In order to study the effects of the factors independent of the age of the subject, the team focused on younger mice.

In the myofiber-specific model, the researchers found that adding the Yamanaka factors accelerated muscle regeneration in mice; the factors achieved this by reducing the levels of a protein called Wnt4 in the niche and this in turn activated the satellite cells. However, in the satellite-cell-specific model, Yamanaka factors did not activate satellite cells, nor did they improve muscle regeneration; the research team hypothesised, therefore, that Wnt4 plays a vital role in muscle regeneration [2].

Professor Izpisua Belmonte feels the results of the study might eventually lead to new treatments by targeting Wnt4.

“Our laboratory has recently developed novel gene-editing technologies that could be used to accelerate muscle recovery after injury and improve muscle function,” he says. “We could potentially use this technology to either directly reduce Wnt4 levels in skeletal muscle or to block the communication between Wnt4 and muscle stem cells [1].”

As well as looking at muscle regeneration, the Salk team are investigating alternative ways of cell rejuvenation, including using mRNA and genetic engineering. They hope that the research could lead to new approaches that could, in the future, trigger tissue and organ regeneration.

[1] https://www.salk.edu/news-release/new-study-shows-how-to-boost-muscle-regeneration-and-rebuild-tissue/
[2] https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-23353-z

Image credits: Shawn Kashou / Shutterstock and the Salk Institute

Comment on this article

Eleanor Garth
Deputy Editor Now a science and medicine journalist, Eleanor worked as a consultant for university spin-out companies and provided research support at Imperial College London and various London hospitals in a former life.
MitoQ

Most popular

New NAD+ boosting longevity supplement hits the market

Elevant Prime dietary supplement contains a “high purity” form of NMN that has completed safety and toxicology testing. New York based health and wellness brand...

David Sinclair to co-chair $200 million biotech SPAC

Christian Angermayer's Frontier Acquisition Corp. holds significant longevity interest with David Sinclair and Peter Attia as Co-Chairs of the Board. Frontier Acquisition Corporation, a special...

Tree of Longevity – understanding how supplements work

Pathways? Hallmarks? Biomarkers? Understanding the longevity supplements lingo can help you make better choices for your healthspan. Longevity supplements differ from other 'generic supplements' as...

Spermidine: the mind-enhancing supplement

Scientists are finding that a high intake of dietary spermidine could slow down (or reverse) the brain aging process. Memory loss and slower brain function...
fundraising

Related articles

Brinter accelerates 3D bioprinting with €1.2m seed fund

Modular multi-material 3D bioprinting solution hopes to develop cost-effective answer to global need for kidney transplants. Turku-based bioprinting start-up Brinter has today announced the successful closure...

Melatonin shown to slow exhaustion of the ovarian reserve

Chinese researchers demonstrate that melatonin delays ovarian aging in mice by slowing down the exhaustion of the ovarian reserve. Previous studies have demonstrated that long-term...

Small molecule can rejuvenate the Alzheimer’s brain

Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) have identified a small molecule that can be used to rejuvenate the brain of Alzheimer's sufferers...

Oisín seed raise advances therapies for diseases of aging

Oisín Biotechnologies funding tops $9.5 million, with additional funding set to support preclinical development of its platform and investigational therapy for kidney and other age-related diseases. Seattle-based...

Wind the clock back three years… in just eight weeks?

New clinical trial demonstrates that mitigating DNA methylation with diet and lifestyle can produce a Horvath aging clock-measured biological age reduction of over...
Supps report ad middle