Human Longevity, Inc. publishes study results

After a quiet period, Human Longevity, Inc. releases interesting results in the National Academy of Sciences’ journal. 

Human Longevity, Inc. (HLI) announced  the publication of a study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The study titled, “Precision medicine integrating whole-genome sequencing, comprehensive metabolomics, and advanced imaging,” showed that by integrating whole-genome sequencing with advanced imaging and blood metabolites identified adults at risk for key health conditions.

Data from 1190 self-referred individuals evaluated with HLI’s health platform, Health Nucleus, showed findings associated with age-related chronic conditions including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, chronic liver disease, and neurological disorders – leading causes of pre-mature mortality in adults.

“The goal of precision medicine is to provide a path to assist physicians in achieving disease prevention and implementing accurate treatment strategies,” said C. Thomas Caskey, MD, FACP, FACMG, FRSC, chief medical officer for Human Longevity, Inc., lead author of the study, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. “Our study showed that by employing a holistic and data-driven health assessment for each individual, we are able to achieve early disease detection in adults.”

Study highlights include:

  • Approximately 1 in 6 adult individuals (17.3%) had at least one pathogenic genetic variant, and when integrated with deep phenotyping (imaging, blood test, etc.), 1 in 9 (11.9%) had genotype and phenotype associations, supporting the clinical diagnosis of a genetic disorder;
  • A lack of phenotype and genotype associations were observed in 5.8% of individuals with pathogenic genetic variants, further suggesting that the identification of pathogenic genetic variant(s) by sequencing alone is not sufficient for a definitive diagnosis, highlighting the importance of a multi-modal assessment;
  • Genomics and metabolomics associations revealed 5.1% of heterozygous carriers with phenotype manifestations, affecting serum metabolite levels, suggesting that some genetic carriers may not be completely asymptomatic;
  • Additional highly actionable findings in this self-referred cohort, most of which were not previously known, include:
    • Insulin resistance and/or impaired glucose tolerance (34.2%)
    • Elevated liver fat (29.2%)
    • Cardiac structure or function abnormalities such as valvular disorders (16.2%)
    • Significant calcified coronary artery plaque (calcium score > 100) (11.4%).

“This study shows that the definition of ‘healthy’ may not be what we think it is and depends upon a comprehensive health evaluation,” said J. Craig Venter, PhD, founder, Human Longevity, Inc. and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Some welcome news for the HLI team and helpful in fundraising – which we assume will be taking-up some management time at the moment.

Image credit: Nicole Glass Photography / Shutterstock
Phil Newman
Editor-in-Chief Phil has over 25 years of C-level management, marketing and business development expertise in Europe and North America. His creative background has helped him shape unconventional strategies for commercial growth - garnering both awards and investor ROI.

Phil has wide experience of technology transfer and the commercialisation of innovations from both private and institutional sources and this led to his interest in Longevity and the founding of Longevity.Technology.

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