Longevity2020: Day 1 recap

The first day of Longevity2020 kicked off yesterday as we welcomed some of the big names in Longevity to the virtual stage.

Curated by AgeCurve’s Attila Csordas, the first day’s session was broadly based on the concept of biological aging, and how to define and target it. Topping the bill, Harvard University’s George Church spoke about the reversal of aging pathways and diseases, revealing that his lab is now moving into larger animal studies on age reversal.

Defining biological aging

Speaking in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, Nir Barzilai of the Institute for Aging Research discussed how the science of aging could be leveraged to improve older adults’ immune health. Barzilai made the case that existing geroprotectors, such as metformin, rapamycin and resveratrol, have the potential to revert the decline in immunity among the elderly.

Lynne Cox from the University of Oxford talked about the need to redefine aging, which is not caused by single genes, but rather a result of complex, inter-dependent biological networks. Richard Siow of King’s College London delivered a fascinating view of Longevity “from cell to society”, which even touched on topics that included space and the afterlife.

The session was concluded with three key speakers, starting with Telocyte’s Michael Fossel, who made a strong case for telomerase therapy and its ability to positively impact senescent cells, neural function and cognitive decline. Fossel was followed by the National University of Singapore’s Brian Kennedy, who presented, among other things, the compelling results seen in positive impact of alpha keto-gluterate on frailty in mice, before Aubrey de Grey of the SENS Foundation discussed how defining aging correctly will ultimately help us to defeat it.

Longevity2020

Following the main session, VIP guests participated in a very active Ask Me Anything session, which saw a panel of the day’s experts answer questions ranging from the straightforward to the deeply complex.

Longevity.Technology’s editor-in-chief Phil Newman was delighted with the first day’s action.

“Wow, what a great start!” he said. “We’ve had such great support from our speakers and I can’t thank them enough for helping us put this together – I’ve been overwhelmed with positive feedback from attendees in my inbox and on social media. Today is a big one – and we’re really looking forward to it.”

Today’s session is focused on Rejuvenation therapies, and brings together some of brightest minds behind the development of novel anti-aging therapeutics. We look forward to seeing you there!

Rejuvenation therapies

Image credit: Arek Socha from Pixabay
Danny Sullivan
Contributing Editor Danny has worked in technology communications for more than 15 years, spanning Europe and North America. From bionics and lasers to software and pharmaceuticals – and everything in between – he’s covered it all. Danny has wide experience of technology publishing and technical writing and has specific interest in the transfer from idea to market.

Latest articles

Fountain’s ‘hypothesis-free’ approach to Longevity AI

We reached out to Fountain’s CEO John Dimos to see what more we can learn about the mysterious San Francisco start-up. When it comes to...

G3 and Juvenescence partner on deep learning venture

G3 Therapeutics and Juvenescence announce the formation of Juvenomics to apply deep molecular profiling and deep learning to tackle aging. Juvenomics, a joint venture between...

Building an artificial immune system

DoD-funded ThirdLaw Technologies to harness the power of ‘spiroligomers’ to rapidly build new small molecules for Longevity therapies. Far from the world of stock market...

Neurotech is the new blue ocean

Alon Braun, Co-Founder, Neurotech Analytics.