UK doctors told to ignore consumer genetic tests

Latest articles

Peptide therapeutics company targets age-related disease

Gray Matter working with Insilico Medicine to identify peptide targets and accelerate development timeline for age-related disease therapies. Earlier this month, we brought you the...

Buck researchers provide a framework to study precision nutrigeroscience

One size doesn't fit all – a new research sub-specialty deals with the fact that health benefits from many forms of dietary restriction vary...

Accelerating antiaging research by hacking longevity

Bringing together aging researchers, developers and entrepreneurs, the Longevity Hackathon aims to build new tools, raise awareness and attract talent to the field. Kicking off...

X marks the spot for meaningful information on aging and cognition

Understanding chromosomal differences between men and women could be the X Factor when it comes to tackling cognitive decline. A new paper published in Jama...

Most read

Tree of Longevity – understanding how supplements work

Pathways? Hallmarks? Biomarkers? Understanding the longevity supplements lingo can help you make better choices for your healthspan. Longevity supplements differ from other 'generic supplements' as...

An antiaging supplement that also reduces appetite?

One for the AGEs: Juvify signs IP licensing deal with Buck Institute for GLYLO antiaging supplement that aims to reduce glycation. A researcher at the...

Berberine could be longevity’s “best-kept secret”

From tackling senescence to lowering blood sugar, berberine is the supplement with a host of tricks up its sleeves. Berberine is a bioactive compound found...

Editor's picks

Peptide therapeutics company targets age-related disease

Gray Matter working with Insilico Medicine to identify peptide targets and accelerate development timeline for age-related disease therapies. Earlier this month, we brought you the...

Buck researchers provide a framework to study precision nutrigeroscience

One size doesn't fit all – a new research sub-specialty deals with the fact that health benefits from many forms of dietary restriction vary...

Accelerating antiaging research by hacking longevity

Bringing together aging researchers, developers and entrepreneurs, the Longevity Hackathon aims to build new tools, raise awareness and attract talent to the field. Kicking off...

Click the globe for translations.

Royal College of General Practitioners guidance places significant doubt on consumer genetic testing.

Consumer interest in genetic testing has grown in popularity in recent years, and sales of testing kits are booming, with the market set to hit $6.36 billion by 2028 [1]. Genetic testing kits are intended to provide consumers with information about their DNA, ancestry, future health and Longevity, without having to go to their doctor.

Guidance on direct-to-consumer genomic testing published in a joint statement by The Royal College of General Practitioners and the British Society for Genetic Medicine stated [2]:

“… health professionals should exercise caution when asked to offer, or provide, clinical expertise about the results of Direct to Consumer (DTC) genomic or genetic testing. The analytical validity, sensitivity and clinical utility of such testing may be much lower than is popularly perceived. For certain types of DTC results, there is a very high chance of false positive or false negative results.”

The guidance should be of interest to investors and potential investors into companies offering such services. Companies such as 23andMe, which received $300m investment from GlaxoSmithKline in July 2018, and Color Genomics are two of the leading players in this sector, now being joined by a host of new start-ups focused on consumer genetic testing [3].

The consumer testing kits promise to unravel the secrets behind a person’s DNA from a biological sample such as saliva, which is then sent to the company for analysis. Some companies claim to provide insight into risks of particular diseases, while others go a step further and claim tests that can reveal information on personality and talent.

Ovarian Longevity webinar

Some may see consumer genetic tests as a potential preventive measure against disease and a way to get useful information without having to visit numerous medical professionals. However, understanding and extrapolating the genetic data and its meaning is a complex process and consumers may end up re-directing their results to physicians to help decipher them. Most consumer genetic tests do not sequence the whole DNA, they look for specific variants or lack thereof in the genetic code. The results can often show false positives, presenting elements that are not actually present in the person’s DNA. [4]

The official guidance goes on to say:

“Gene variants giving information regarding single gene conditions or predispositions: examples may be variants in breast cancer related genes (BRCA1 or BRCA2), or the Cystic Fibrosis gene (CFTR). Results may be:

  • False negatives: The genes may have many different types of variation within them, yet often DTC testing only looks for a small proportion. Thus testing will miss a large proportion of these, for example in the region of 80% of known BRCA1/2 mutations are missed by commercial companies who generally only analyse three of the many different possible mutations.
  • False positives: DTC tests that use a “SNP chip ” [single nucleotide polymorphism] technique [used by the majority of companies in operation in 2019] are very likely to categorise rare variants wrongly2. Thus 85-95% of BRCA1/2 variants or Bowel cancer gene variants for example, will be false positives or artefacts. The impact of false positives will likely place increasing demand on the health service which will need to spend considerable time and money counselling patients and reanalysing their samples.”
Ovarian Longevity webinar

In addition to questions about the quality control for consumer genetic tests, there is also the question of how safe a consumer’s data is. As vital personal health information is collected, it is important to know what happens to the data after the results are provided. Last year, a Fast Company report indicated that 23AndMe and Ancestry were being investigated by the Federal Trade Commission over policies regarding data security and personal information sharing [5].

[1] https://prn.to/2Qa5p9l
[2] https://bit.ly/2O3uP68
[3] https://craft.co/23andme/competitors
[4] https://www.bmj.com/content/367/bmj.l5688
[5] https://bit.ly/2CDevDI

 

 

 

 

 

Salvinija Roznyte
Staff Writer Salvinija Roznyte is a writer and journalist based in London. She graduated in 2018 with a Bachelor's degree majoring in Writing and Journalism with a minor in Film Studies. She is interested in the way modern medical technology changes and shapes our world.

Most popular

Tree of Longevity – understanding how supplements work

Pathways? Hallmarks? Biomarkers? Understanding the longevity supplements lingo can help you make better choices for your healthspan. Longevity supplements differ from other 'generic supplements' as...

An antiaging supplement that also reduces appetite?

One for the AGEs: Juvify signs IP licensing deal with Buck Institute for GLYLO antiaging supplement that aims to reduce glycation. A researcher at the...

Berberine could be longevity’s “best-kept secret”

From tackling senescence to lowering blood sugar, berberine is the supplement with a host of tricks up its sleeves. Berberine is a bioactive compound found...

Spermidine: the mind-enhancing supplement

Scientists are finding that a high intake of dietary spermidine could slow down (or reverse) the brain aging process. Memory loss and slower brain function...

Related articles

SENS spin-out Underdog closes $10m financing round

Underdog Pharmaceuticals, a key investment of rejuvenation biotech VC Kizoo, has closed a $10 million round of capital. Michael Greve’s Kizoo Technology Capital Group led the...

Unlocking ovarian aging could prolong fertility and delay menopause

Ovarian aging is poorly understood, under-researched and under-invested. We need a radical rethink of how we address fertility and the menopause – it's time...

Occuity raises over £2.5m for optical diabetes devices

UK MedTech firm Occuity successfully raises over £2.5m to deliver ophthalmic and optical diabetes devices and is now overfunding on Seedrs to accelerate development. DISCLOSURE:...

Fauna closes $9 million to expand drug discovery platform

Leveraging animal genomics to improve human health, Fauna Bio set to expand its comparative genomics platform for novel target drug discovery. Silicon Valley biotech startup...

Targeting cognitive decline with medical food

Mitocholine raising funding for clinical trial of nutritional compound that addresses cognitive decline by bridging the ‘brain energy gap’. DISCLOSURE: Longevity.Technology (a brand of First...
Nutriop